Wearable technologies that failed like a sinked boat

Failed Wearables

Wearable technologies are always anticipated. More because of the psychology behind the wearable tech. It’s portable, wearable, flauntable, and it’s technical. It’s a modern way of life. The convenience wearable tech affords unsurpassed. But the problem is that most wearable tech come and go like seasons. There is a very thin line between adoption and discard. Wearable tech is a sensitive area. Many companies have honed their products for years, only to be stupefied by an abysmal public response. 

So why does wearable tech fail? What could be the reasons? Here’s a look into some of them.

Late to the fashion parade

Wearable technology is sometimes obsolete fashion-wise even though trendy technology-wise. The fact that it is ‘wearable’ means that people are also looking at its appearance. Tech manufacturers may have the latest and greatest gizmos, but would that also translate into a highly appealing appearance? Question marks linger for this question. Because there is no real answer. The public’s fashion sentiment is highly volatile, fragmented and subjective. Can the wearable gizmos catch up? It’s hard.

Class-based and not mass-based

Wearable technology sometimes only triggers responses from certain categories or income groups. The monies that arise from sales from such customer groups is good. Buy won’t cover the production costs. Leave alone breaking even. In the long run, costs pileup. The wearable technology stands failed for no mistake of its own. Finding a wearable technology with an appearance or technology context that is appealing to the masses is a difficult proposition. But it has been done before. It’s just about putting more action into thought and thought into action. 

What are the famous wearable tech blunders?

Virtual Boy

Nintendo’s foray into virtual reality in 1995 was received with mixed reaction. Although the design was a bit chunky, the experience was even worse. Users complained of jumping visuals and nausea. The product did have a sturdy design. The promise of virtual reality, which was in nascency at that time, was appealing. Yet only about a million and odd units were sold. It was a debacle. 

Virtual Boy
 Wearable trousers

Wearable trousers

When the groin becomes a place to wear a gadget, then it’s time to scratch a surface that is considered socially awkward. Beauty and the Geek, a jeans brand, had the outrageous idea of transforming the crotch area of the wearable jeans into a terminal to interact with a computer. The crotch area would have a full-fledged keyboard control, mouse and even speakers. As expected, people stopped wearing it or thought the idea of wearing one was a one-day experiment. And these wearable trousers became part of failed wearables’ growing list. 

Basis Peak

In 2016, Basis Peak, a smartwatch brand by Intel, caused blisters. It prompted Intel to recall all watches. Only 0.2 of the total production volume were sold. The overheating issue was so pronounced that some customers complained about their chargers melting. So Basis Peak not only had to shell out compensation for their watches but even for the damaged chargers as well.

Basis Peak
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